Tattoos

RECENTLY IN THE NEWS:

NBC News (3/5/2015) reports on its website that "family practioners, gynecologists and even dentists are getting into the cosmetic procedure business, and dermatologists say they're seeing the side effects."  Several dermatologists "from around the country told NBC News that they've had to the fix the mistakes of physicians who are dabbling in their specialty."  In a statement, the American Academy of Dermatology said, "A dermatologist is a licensed medical doctor and the only residency-trained physician fully educated in the science of cutaneous medicine, which includes medical and surgical conditions of the skin, hair, nails, and mucous membranes."

DRY SKIN CARE:

Keep your bathing to a minimum!  Wash with lukewarm water and keep your bathing to less than 10 minutes.  Wash with a soapless cleanser such as Dove and avoid harsh soaps such as Ivory or Irish Spring.  After bathing, moisturize within a few minutes of patting dry with a towel.  Moisturize with a sensitive-skin moisturizer without fragrance.  If you have a skin condition such as eczema, you will need to moisturize a few times per day.

WOUND CARE:

The day after your procedure, allow the cleanser and water to wash over the site.  That is adequate cleaning of the wound.  Thereafter, apply a generous layer of petroleum jelly (Vaseline) or another greasy substance such as Aquaphor healing ointment.  If the area is in contact with clothing, we advise you to cover it with a dressing.  Repeat the same procedure the next day and every day until the wound has healed.

HOW TO APPLY YOUR TOPICAL RETINOID (ACNE PATIENTS):

Topical retinoids include adapalene (Differin), tretinoin (Retin-A, Atralin, Ziana, Veltin, Tretin-X).  Apply a pea-sized amount to your entire face a few minutes after washing your face at bedtime (since most retinoids are inactivated by sunlight).  If your face is dry with the retinoid, apply a moisturizer prior to the application of the retinoid.  

CARE FOR SKIN IN THE SUN:

Use a daily moisturizer with a sunscreen of SPF 15 or higher on the areas that will be exposed.  If you're going to be directly out in the sun, wear an SPF of 30 or higher and make sure the sunscreen says that it is "broad spectrum."  Remember to reapply after two hours and after swimming or any exercising.  Physical sunscreens which contain titanium dioxide and/or zinc oxide are gentle and will not react with the skin.   Seek shade between the hours of 10 am-4 pm.

Check your skin for any new, changing, non-healing or itching lesions four times a year or every major holiday.  If you notice anything that is new or changing or not healing, please call and get it checked.

Our team of professionals and staff believe that informed patients are better equipped to make decisions regarding their health and well-being. For your personal use, we have created an extensive patient library covering an array of educational topics, which can be found on the side of each page. Browse through these diagnoses and treatments to learn more about topics of interest to you.

As always, you can contact our office to answer any questions or concerns.

A tattoo is created by injecting ink into the dermis (the second layer of skin) to incorporate a form of skin decoration. Tattooing is practiced worldwide and has often been a part of cultural or religious rituals. In Western societies today, tattooing has re-emerged as a popular form of self-decoration.

Technically, a tattoo is a series of puncture wounds. An electric device uses a sterilized needle and tubes to penetrate to a deeper layer of skin and inject ink into the opening it creates. The tattoo machine moves the needle up and down between 50 and 3,000 times per minute. The machine's operator, a tattoo artist, will use a flash or stencil of the design you select. Typically the design is outlined in black, shading is filled in and then solid areas of color are completed.

Any puncture wound is susceptible to bacterial or viral infection, which is why it is imperative that you work with a licensed tattoo artist who adheres to stringent infection control standards. Single-use needles and disposable materials should be used in conjunction with sterile procedures, such as the artist wearing latex gloves, cleaning the affected area after each stage of tattooing and using an autoclave to sterilize any materials or equipment that is re-used.

After the tattooing is completed, it is important to care for the damaged skin until it fully heals. Keep a bandage on the area for at least the first 24 hours. Wash the tattoo with antibacterial soap once daily and gently pat it dry. Avoid touching the tattoo and don't pick at the scabs as they form. You can also use an antibiotic ointment to help prevent infection. Do not use petroleum jelly because it may cause fading. If you experience redness or swelling, put ice on the tattoo. Keep your tattoo away from water and out of the sun until it has completely healed.

Complications from tattoos generally involve either an infection or an allergic reaction to the ink. If you have a skin condition, like eczema, you should probably avoid getting any tattoo.

Tattoo Removal

A tattoo is designed to last for a lifetime. However, if your feelings about a tattoo change over time, there is a laser removal technology. The process tends to be expensive, requires multiple visits and can be painful. Essentially, the laser's energy is aimed at pigments in the tattoo. The laser emits short zaps of targeted light that reach the deeper layers of the skin. This stimulates the body's immune system to remove the pigment. It is critical that the procedure be handled in a sterile manner in order to prevent infection. Home care following laser removal treatments is similar to the care recommended for getting a tattoo.