Granuloma

RECENTLY IN THE NEWS:

NBC News (3/5/2015) reports on its website that "family practioners, gynecologists and even dentists are getting into the cosmetic procedure business, and dermatologists say they're seeing the side effects."  Several dermatologists "from around the country told NBC News that they've had to the fix the mistakes of physicians who are dabbling in their specialty."  In a statement, the American Academy of Dermatology said, "A dermatologist is a licensed medical doctor and the only residency-trained physician fully educated in the science of cutaneous medicine, which includes medical and surgical conditions of the skin, hair, nails, and mucous membranes."

DRY SKIN CARE:

Keep your bathing to a minimum!  Wash with lukewarm water and keep your bathing to less than 10 minutes.  Wash with a soapless cleanser such as Dove and avoid harsh soaps such as Ivory or Irish Spring.  After bathing, moisturize within a few minutes of patting dry with a towel.  Moisturize with a sensitive-skin moisturizer without fragrance.  If you have a skin condition such as eczema, you will need to moisturize a few times per day.

WOUND CARE:

The day after your procedure, allow the cleanser and water to wash over the site.  That is adequate cleaning of the wound.  Thereafter, apply a generous layer of petroleum jelly (Vaseline) or another greasy substance such as Aquaphor healing ointment.  If the area is in contact with clothing, we advise you to cover it with a dressing.  Repeat the same procedure the next day and every day until the wound has healed.

HOW TO APPLY YOUR TOPICAL RETINOID (ACNE PATIENTS):

Topical retinoids include adapalene (Differin), tretinoin (Retin-A, Atralin, Ziana, Veltin, Tretin-X).  Apply a pea-sized amount to your entire face a few minutes after washing your face at bedtime (since most retinoids are inactivated by sunlight).  If your face is dry with the retinoid, apply a moisturizer prior to the application of the retinoid.  

CARE FOR SKIN IN THE SUN:

Use a daily moisturizer with a sunscreen of SPF 15 or higher on the areas that will be exposed.  If you're going to be directly out in the sun, wear an SPF of 30 or higher and make sure the sunscreen says that it is "broad spectrum."  Remember to reapply after two hours and after swimming or any exercising.  Physical sunscreens which contain titanium dioxide and/or zinc oxide are gentle and will not react with the skin.   Seek shade between the hours of 10 am-4 pm.

Check your skin for any new, changing, non-healing or itching lesions four times a year or every major holiday.  If you notice anything that is new or changing or not healing, please call and get it checked.

Our team of professionals and staff believe that informed patients are better equipped to make decisions regarding their health and well-being. For your personal use, we have created an extensive patient library covering an array of educational topics, which can be found on the side of each page. Browse through these diagnoses and treatments to learn more about topics of interest to you.

As always, you can contact our office to answer any questions or concerns.

Granuloma is a generic term that refers to a small nodule. It can be any type of nodule, from benign to malignant. Granulomas occur throughout the body. Two types of granuloma apply expressly to the skin:

Pyogenic Granuloma. Pyogenic granuloma looks like small, reddish bumps on the skin that tend to bleed. It is caused by an injury to the skin. It is most frequently found on the hands, arms and face. In some cases, the nodule will spontaneously disappear. More often, the lesions need to be removed by surgery. There may be some scarring as a result of these treatments.

Granuloma Annulare. This type of nodule can occur in any person, but is more common in children and young adults. It is characterized by a ring-shaped lesion that is round and firm; red, white or purple skin around a clear crater of normal skin. It can appear individually or in groups. Most often, it appears on tops of hands and feet, elbows and knees. Most people have no other symptoms, but some may experience itchiness at the site of the lesion. Granuloma annulare can resolve itself and may or may not disappear over time without treatment. However, if the incidence is widespread or aesthetically undesirable, a dermatologist may prescribe a steroid cream or inject steroids just below the skin's surface to speed healing. Another successful treatment is PUVA, in which a medication called psoralen is given and then the area is exposed to ultraviolet light.